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Showing posts from February, 2024

The Real Planet of the Apes

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  As I was writing about Ethics in AI or Responsible AI, I found myself pondering over human ethics and morality and how they have been shaped by our evolution, nature, and nurture. At that time, I remembered a book titled “ The Real Planet of the Apes: A New Story of Human Origins ” by  David R. Begun , which was published several years ago. I had to look for it among the piles of books that I still have to read. My not-so-perfect  Tsundoku . The book is quite intriguing and captivating, and I'm not sure why I didn't read it earlier. Dr. Begun provides a comprehensive exploration into the evolution of primates, leading up to the emergence of humans. He challenges the traditional  Out of Africa  hypothesis by proposing a new perspective on human origins. The book explores the deep evolutionary history of great apes and humans, spanning from approximately 35 to 7 million years ago. Dr. Begun argues that apes evolved crucial human-like traits, such as dexterous hands and larger b

Comparing the Autocratic Nature and Organizational Structure of Fascism and Communism

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  Fascism and communism can be viewed as opposites on the political spectrum, but they share some notable similarities, particularly when it comes to their practical implementation and organizational structures. Both ideologies, as seen in Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, the Soviet Union, China, and Venezuela, have often resulted in autocratic regimes characterized by the concentration of power, suppression of opposition, and strict government control over society and the economy. One of the key similarities between fascism and communism is their tendency towards authoritarianism. In fascist states like Nazi Germany and Mussolini’s Italy, power was heavily concentrated in the hands of a single leader or party. The Nazi Party and Mussolini’s National Fascist Party maintained strict control over all aspects of society. Similarly, in communist regimes such as the Soviet Union under Stalin, China under Mao, and present-day Venezuela, power has been held by a single party or leader, with littl

A Brief Introduction to Quantum Key Distribution (with Python Code)

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I have included examples of Python Code running on ARM Chips and a use case to protect communication channels between satellites. I have given examples of cube satellites. In the realm of cybersecurity, the quest for unbreakable encryption has led to the development of Quantum Key Distribution (QKD), this tried and tested approach that leverages the principles of quantum mechanics to ensure the secure exchange of encryption keys. This technical blog post delves into the intricacies of QKD, elucidating its step-by-step process with a focus on the roles of the participants: Alice (the sender), Bob (the receiver), and the potential eavesdropper, Evil Eve. Let’s embark on a journey into the quantum realm of secure communication. Introduction to Quantum Key Distribution Quantum Key Distribution is a protocol that enables two parties to produce a shared random secret key, known only to them, which can then be used to encrypt and decrypt messages. What sets QKD apart from classical key distri
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  Efficient Tensor Network Simulation of IBM’s Eagle-Kicked Ising Experiment The research paper  focuses on the classical simulation of a kicked Ising quantum system on the heavy hexagon lattice. It compares the accuracy and efficiency of this classical simulation with a recent quantum processor simulation. The authors employ a tensor network approach that reflects the lattice’s geometry and is contracted using belief propagation, resulting in significantly more accurate and precise results than those obtained from the quantum processor and other classical methods. They quantify the treelike correlations of the wave function to explain the accuracy of their belief propagation-based approach and demonstrate its ability to simulate the system to long times in the thermodynamic limit, equivalent to a quantum computer with an infinite number of qubits. The paper suggests that their tensor network approach has broader applications for simulating the dynamics of quantum systems with treelike